Avatar
Highlighting forgotten, neglected, abandoned, forsaken, unrecognized, unacknowledged, overshadowed, out-of-fashion, under-translated writers. Has no one read your books? You are in good company.

Brought to you by

50 Watts (WS)
Invisible Stories (SS)
(un)justly (un)read (JS)

throwoffharvester@noteemail.notvalideditorsthrowoffharvester@noteemail.notvalid@writersthrowoffharvester@noteemail.notvalidnoonethrowoffharvester@noteemail.notvalidreads.com

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

WNOR 2013 Book Preview

Disclaimer

These writers are famous in some part of the internet or the world. Some may be famous in your own family or in your own mind.

browse by country

Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
China
Czech Republic
Denmark
England
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Iran
Italy
Japan
Lithuania
Martinique
Mexico
Morocco
Netherlands
Poland
Romania
Russia
Scotland
Serbia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
United States


Posts tagged Aztecs
No one reads Bernardino de Sahagún, in whose books you can find passages from the Aztec like this:

it becomes long, deep; it widens, extends, narrows. it is a constricted place, a narrowed place, one of the hollowed-out places. there are roughened places; there are asperous places. it is frightening, a fearful place, a place of death. it is called a place of death because there is dying. it is a place of darkness; it darkens; it stands ever dark. it stands wide-mouthed; it is widemouthed. it is wide-mouthed; it is narrow mouthed. it has mouths which pass through. i place myself in the cave. i enter the cave. 

From “the cave” via airform archives
From wikipedia: “Born in Sahagún, Spain, in 1499, he journeyed to New Spain in 1529, and spent more than 50 years conducting interviews regarding Aztec beliefs, culture and history. Though he primarily dedicated himself to the missionary task, his extraordinary work documenting indigenous worldview and culture has earned him the title ‘the first anthropologist.’ He also contributed to the description of the Aztec language Nahuatl, into which he translated the Psalms, the Gospels and a basic manual of religious education.”
A link to Amazon for the many volumes of the Florentine Codex.
Maybe this post should be titled “No one reads the Aztecs.” I know I don’t, though now I want to.

No one reads Bernardino de Sahagún, in whose books you can find passages from the Aztec like this:

it becomes long, deep; it widens, extends, narrows. it is a constricted place, a narrowed place, one of the hollowed-out places. there are roughened places; there are asperous places. it is frightening, a fearful place, a place of death. it is called a place of death because there is dying. it is a place of darkness; it darkens; it stands ever dark. it stands wide-mouthed; it is widemouthed. it is wide-mouthed; it is narrow mouthed. it has mouths which pass through. i place myself in the cave. i enter the cave. 

From “the cave” via airform archives

From wikipedia: “Born in Sahagún, Spain, in 1499, he journeyed to New Spain in 1529, and spent more than 50 years conducting interviews regarding Aztec beliefs, culture and history. Though he primarily dedicated himself to the missionary task, his extraordinary work documenting indigenous worldview and culture has earned him the title ‘the first anthropologist.’ He also contributed to the description of the Aztec language Nahuatl, into which he translated the Psalms, the Gospels and a basic manual of religious education.”

A link to Amazon for the many volumes of the Florentine Codex.

Maybe this post should be titled “No one reads the Aztecs.” I know I don’t, though now I want to.