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Posts tagged Adrian Ross
Ramsey Campbell actually included an entire novel—The Hole of the Pit—in his 1992 anthology of supernatural fiction, Uncanny Banquet. He tells why:

Adrian Ross was the pseudonym of Arthur Reed Ropes (1859–1933), a Cambridge don. In 1891 he began a new career by writing the libretto of an opera in the Savoy vein, Joan of Arc. In the next thirty years he wrote over two thousand lyrics and produced almost sixty musical plays and farces. None of this prepares us for what appears to have been his only work of fiction, The Hole of the Pit, published as a novel in 1914 by Edward Arnold and never reprinted until now. While it is dedicated to the author’s friend and colleague M. R. James, it owes at least as much to William Hope Hodgson, but it is its own book. Only its extreme rarity has prevented it from being acknowledged as one of the first masterpieces of the novel of supernatural terror.

Ramsey Campbell actually included an entire novel—The Hole of the Pit—in his 1992 anthology of supernatural fiction, Uncanny Banquet. He tells why:

Adrian Ross was the pseudonym of Arthur Reed Ropes (1859–1933), a Cambridge don. In 1891 he began a new career by writing the libretto of an opera in the Savoy vein, Joan of Arc. In the next thirty years he wrote over two thousand lyrics and produced almost sixty musical plays and farces. None of this prepares us for what appears to have been his only work of fiction, The Hole of the Pit, published as a novel in 1914 by Edward Arnold and never reprinted until now. While it is dedicated to the author’s friend and colleague M. R. James, it owes at least as much to William Hope Hodgson, but it is its own book. Only its extreme rarity has prevented it from being acknowledged as one of the first masterpieces of the novel of supernatural terror.