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Highlighting forgotten, neglected, abandoned, forsaken, unrecognized, unacknowledged, overshadowed, out-of-fashion, under-translated writers. Has no one read your books? You are in good company.

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These writers are famous in some part of the internet or the world. Some may be famous in your own family or in your own mind.

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No one reads Roberto Arlt (1900-1942), an Argentine author of novels, short stories, articles, and plays—he even fancied himself an inventor: in 1932 he registered a patent on a method to prevent runs in pantyhose.

Borges praised Arlt’s prose; Cortázar read him passionately in his youth, and Juan Carlos Onetti (another writer no one reads) had this to say:

If ever anyone from these shores could be called a literary genius, his name was Roberto Arlt. … I am talking about art and of a great and strange artist. … I am talking about a writer who understood better than anyone else the city in which he was born. More deeply, perhaps, than those who wrote the immortal tangos. I am talking about a novelist who will be famous in time … and who, unbelievably, is almost unknown in the world today. [Translated by Michele Aynesworth; her notes from Mad Toy are the source for the above praises.]

Sources in English (Amazon US links):

Of the two works available in English, my favourite is The Seven Madmen (pictured above): ingeniously captured and articulated spasms of madness are littered throughout the book, one gem after another—reminiscent of Céline. Humorous tics of the psyche, eccentric characters, anarchistic undercurrents, and a portrait of living in the urban rain shadow are just some of the features that make this short novel worth a read—even if its sequel (The Flame-Throwers) is never translated into English.

(Image: designed by Oscar Zarate)

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  7. marcedith reblogged this from writersnoonereads and added:
    …… Roberto Arlt (1900-1942), an Argentine author of novels, short stories, articles, and plays…..(Image: designed by...
  8. olanzapina reblogged this from writersnoonereads and added:
    Roberto Arlt was a genius. It saddens me to see how little-known he is in the non-Spanish speaking world (and, let’s be...
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  12. lectora reblogged this from writersnoonereads and added:
    Ah, but I’ve read quite a bit of Arlt. It’s been interesting to see the authors that get listed, since I’ve yet to...
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  14. unjustlyunread reblogged this from writersnoonereads and added:
    No one reads Roberto Arlt (1900-1942), an Argentine author of novels, short stories, articles, and plays—he even fancied...
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